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Android App Player for Windows Available for Download
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Android App Player for Windows Available for Download

by Charles PowersMarch 27, 2012

Bluestacks, a Windows program that lets users play Android apps on their PC, has reportedly entered the beta testing phases. This Android App player for Windows made a big splash when its Alpha testing was announced last year and now it looks like the company is ready to proceed to the next phase.

No word yet as to the pricing model but early reports hint at some sort of subscription fee once the program officially launches.

You can head to the Bluestacks website to download the beta, fair warning you’ll be one of thousands so the page might be slow.

About The Author
Charles Powers
Charles Powers
Charles is the Founder of The Game Fanatics and nonprofit, United We Game. A Full-Time Creative Director and Graphic Designer, he loves video games with a fanatical passion and uses TGF as his outlet for all things geek culture.
  • Starbuck

    I’ve been waiting a long time for this.

  • Lorrie Lauro

    Basically, I want to know the method for downloading apps from Android market on my PC, then transfer the install file to my mobile phone and then set up the app on my phone, not PC. Remember To give detailed procedure. Thanks

  • Loretta Neale

    When I go to the Android apps internet site and attempt to down load an app it tells me I do not have any wise telephones linked to my E-mail address…. How can I get applications for my phone with out having to use net on my phone?

  • Tia Zuehlke

    I function in the Newport News/Virginia Seashore area. What are the must_have android apps for taxi motorists in my area?

  • Louisa Ellman

    i lately had to make the hardest desision of my life. i had to decide in between the eris and the droid. i went with the eris, im prety sure they all operate on the very same applications given that there androids but if not permit me know. i want to know some awesome apps. tell me your preferred and sick give it a shot.
    i also need to know some of the greatest iphone applications my ideal friends acquiring a iphone and shed like to know some applications also. -thanks(:

  • Tia Zuehlke

    When i go to the android marketplace website in my nook and i try out to down load apps, it tells me that there are no android associated telephones with this account. (I login with my google account) please support me thanks.

  • Serena Frieden

    i want to down load android applications to my pc from android marketplace for my android device. any possibility? i don’t want to down load utilizing my android device.

  • Heidi Cabrera

    I’m organizing to get a WiFi only Honeycomb tablet(say xoom or acer a500). But I will not have any wifi router now, however I Am planning to get 1 later. So, for the moment, how can I down load android applications from the android market and install it to my android device?

  • Kathleen Frias

    I’m a 16 year outdated boy who is interested and inspired by one more kid who is 14 and made an iphone app. So much he has produced millions on his apps. I wanna develop some apps and I figured the android market place would most likely be simplest way. What does it take to produce apps. Also would it aid if I had an android phone?

  • Jeanie Roudebush

    I just acquired my initial android telephone (lg optimus 2x). I have been searching market place for some free aps. Got a few, but dont genuinely know which types are good. What applications do you very suggest checking out?

  • Janet Somerville

    i lately had to make the hardest desision of my life. i had to decide among the eris and the droid. i went with the eris, im prety sure they all operate on the very same apps considering that there androids but if not let me know. i need to know some brilliant apps. inform me your favored and unwell give it a shot.
    i also need to know some of the ideal iphone applications my very best friends acquiring a iphone and shed like to know some applications also. -thanks(:

  • Elijah luv

    I work in the Newport News/Virginia Beach area. What are the must_have android apps for taxi drivers in my area?

  • mrankinmatt

    I’m planning to buy a WiFi only Honeycomb tablet(say xoom or acer a500). But I don’t have any wifi router now, though I’m planning to buy one later. So, for the moment, how can I download android apps from the android market and install it to my android device?

  • Eric

    Basically, I want to know the procedure for downloading apps from Android market on my PC, then transfer the install file to my phone and then install the app on my phone, not PC. Please give detailed procedure. Thanks

  • Gage

    If you like any one over the other, give a reason. Don’t just say “I like iPhones *drool*”. There’s websites for fanboys, go there.

    iOS – Apple’s iOS for the iPhones.
    Pros:
    Stable
    Good for Gaming
    Simple to use for idiots
    Excellent music player and multimedia support
    Cons:
    No Widget support
    Only one phone…on one carrier
    Multitasking is a joke
    Very, very few customization options
    Folders option is a joke
    Can’t take music off of it

    BlackBerryOS – Research In-Motion’s software for Blackberries
    Pros:
    Stable
    Business Oriented (you can use office programs, read pdf)
    Better E-Mail support
    Multiple phones on multiple carriers
    BlackBerry Messenger
    Cons:
    No Widget support
    Hasn’t been given a real update in a long time
    Terrible multimedia interface
    Very, very few customization options
    Not a lot of app support in the BlackBerry Market

    Windows 7 – Windows completely revamped OS
    Pros:
    Microsoft Office support
    Widget support
    Excellent multimedia interface
    Gorgeous user interface
    Multiple phones on multiple carriers
    Cons:
    Still new, so not so stable
    Still new, so not so many apps
    Tile widget system is limited
    More customization options than BBOS or iOS, but still not many

    Android:
    Boatload of customization options
    Boatload of phones on the most carriers
    Open Source (meaning, you can see the source code for it)
    Frequently updated
    Support for business oriented users. PDF, Office, etc
    Support for wifi tethering
    Widget support
    Cons:
    No really good multimedia support
    Least stable of the 4 (the newest update, Gingerbread, works on this, but only 1 phone has it atm)
    No standard for updating (meaning, any phone released has no guarantee that they’ll get an update)

    In my honest opinion, Android rules the mobile phone world right now. The most phones, the best software, the most customization options (plus HTC Sense, Motoblur, Expresso, Touchwiz or just plain old Android), with business support…it seems all it’s missing is a good multimedia app and a standard for updating.

    I’ve owned phones that use all of them, and I’ve enjoyed the Android experience most of all (ditching all my others to keep my HTC G2). I still own an iPod touch (which rules the mp3 player market, hands down), but I think iPhones are overrated and overhyped and don’t really do much of anything on their own.

    Feel free to hate on, agree with or offer another opinion. Just thought I’d see what the users thought was best.
    Best answer is going to the voters. Although I think because of the ADD of the internet, there won’t be many who stick around to read the whole thing.

  • Roar me R

    I currently have a Samsung Focus and I love it. However, I also have a Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 and a Samsung Player, yes I am a Samsung kind of guy haha. I am wondering if I should buy a new Windows Phone or just get an Android because I honestly love both, but I hate iOS and Apple, so please don’t recommend that. If I went to get a new Android Phone, I would wait until the Samsung Galaxy S3 comes to America and if I went to get a new Windows Phone, it would be the Samsung Focus 2.

    Reasons why I like Android:
    Love the UI
    Love the open source platform
    Can put whatever I want on it, such as AVI movies, etc. and can download a player for any multimedia format.
    Expandable memory (same with windows phone, but cannot be removed)

    Reasons why I like Windows Phone:
    Amazing UI
    New and fresh
    Microsoft fan
    Zune
    amazing keyboard
    great features to the overall operating system.

    Both of them are a tie for me. I hate not having apps like Angry Birds Space for Windows Phone, but those are on Android, so I like that. Overall, Android is much more mature than windows phone, and I am just torn between the two. I like the Google Play Store for android much better, I like Google Music (use it and no good app for it for windows phone), and I love it being open source. I love windows phone for the great “eye catching” features, the great UI, the standards so fragmentation isn’t that big of a deal, and overall, it is more polished like iOS but better in my opinion. I find Windows phone to be the midpoint between Android and iOS mainly because it is simple like iOS but has the features and “eye candy effects” like Android. I love both, please someone, help me out here. Thanks in advance.

  • thexbox360player

    so im using my dads old htc sense because my phone was stolen, its not android, its htc windows. but facebook doesn’t work, Marketplace doesn’t work, Twitter (or ‘peep’) doesnt work, music player doesnt work, windows media player doesnt work? im actually getting amazingly annoyed with this phone. apparently marketplace was shut down, so maybe thats why nothings working. but for real? did they leave the original htc with any form of app store? if so what is it? thanks

  • Keegan

    India has never been an important market for Apple. During the early ’90s when I was fresh in the advertising business, Macs ruled the Creative & Studio Departments of advertising agencies. Even then, the onus of marketing and servicing Macs was on the local re-seller. There wasn’t much of a concerted effort from Apple. Later, PC’s became pretty much the norm for graphics, Office Suites and everything else. Today, it’s common to find seasoned Art Directors being comfortable only on a Windows PC. Yes, there are Macs in Studios and Art Departments but it’s more an exception than the norm – chief culprit being the high price of the Mac.

    Then came the iPod which introduced Apple and it’s ecosystem to a whole new generation. And with much friendlier pricing, Macbook’s have an appeal to a potentially large audience. Apple re-sellers have mushroomed in major cities. So in terms of a product portfolio, at the high end they have iMacs, Macbook Pros and iPhone. At the popular pricing level, they have a few iPods and the Macbook. Add to it, a fantastic OS in Snow Leopard and accessories like Magic Mouse, the Apple portfolio is extremely appealing. And there is a retail network of sorts in place. Yet we all know that Apple is virtually a non-player in India – be it in mobile phones, desktops or laptops. The reason is not hard to seek: Apple is simply not interested in India.

    It’s a litany of woes for the Apple fan in India:

    – iPhone: a right royal pricing mess. It was DOA as far as India was concerned with that kind of pricing

    – no signs of iPhone 3Gs: this despite the promise made by Phil Schiller in Jan ‘09 that the iPhone 3Gs will be launched in Aug 09 here. The Apple re-sellers haven’t a clue and they keep giving fresh dates of launch every time you ask them.

    – no music on the iTunes India store: it’s moronic, to say the least, that in one of the world’s most music-rich countries, iTunes doesn’t offer music

    – every major Apple product released in the US doesn’t find it’s way here: the Magic Mouse being a case in point. It is still available on a ‘pre-order basis’ at the re-sellers.

    – Apple India’s Customer Support sucks

    Apple may not have huge market share or value ambitions from the Desktop/laptop market in India. They will never be able to compete with local manufacturers, assemblers on price. Plus, category dynamics are so stacked up against Apple. A market ruled by Microsoft, ubiquity of pirated software, ignorance of what Apple’s integrated approach really is, apathy towards Apple – there are enough reasons for Apple’s poor chances of success in India.

    With iPhone, I think they have a chance of generating huge volumes and value in India, if – and it’s a big if – Apple chooses to do so. India is far ahead of the US in many ways when it comes to the telecom market – we are a lot more demanding from our handset and service provider -the dynamics of the category are different here. Despite iPhone’s flaws – perceived or otherwise, I feel it was the best bet Apple had to broad-base their appeal. One of the big reasons for it’s success in the West – the App Store would have been a great advantage here. Even abroad, that advantage can dwindle any time. If Apple has 100,000 apps today, it’s a matter of time before the Android, Blackberry and Ovi stores populate their stores with large numbers. The fortress Apple built around the iPhone is not impregnable.

    Taking a cue from Apple’s App Store all the big boys have launched India-specific app stores. Nokia, Aircel (Pocketapps), Airtel (App Central), Blackerry – they all have their app stores. It’s a matter of time before India/city-specific apps come into the picture, with an ability to pay through local currency… maybe even through iTunes-like accounts. When that happens, any potential advantage the iPhone had would disappear.

    With a mobile population of 500mn and counting, India is a mouth watering prospect for telecom marketers. And the potential of VAS and ARPU is yet to be realized fully. But the bigger opportunity lies elsewhere. It is well documented that the classic pyramidal structure of Indian consumer markets will change to accommodate the bulging middle class (the Aspirers) in the near future.

    The estimated size of the Aspirer’s market is 124mn households. Agreed, not all of them may be potential customers for the iPhone. But with the right kind of pricing, a chunk of the Aspirers could be. This group, while being price sensitive is characterized by seeing premium experiences at popular prices. For them, the likeliest port of call when it comes to smartphones is unlikely to be an iPhone, given the marketing (or the lack of it) here in India.
    It is unlikely that Apple isn’t aware of the attraction of India, as a market. But they deliberately seem to be ignoring it. If and when they plan to make a fist of it here (with the iPhone perhaps, given the mobile population here), it may be too late. The competition seems to have the ‘will to win’ and is backing it up with action. They are smarter, agile and getting ahead of Apple. Does Apple care?
    The initial argument was that, the lack of availability of the 3G spectrum in India is “stopping Apple” to consider it a serious market!!! How outlandish! These guys don’t consider the second largest telecom market in the world as “serious”??? I smell American superiority complex! Oh by the way we DO have 3G now! So what is “stopping” Apple now? Smart phones that cost more than India have been sold more than the iPhone SEVERAL HUNDRED TIMES!
    With a solid presence in China, it is quite obvious that Apple Inc. is simply ignoring India, A HUGE HUGE MARKET! No wonder Apple is beginning to lose its charm! They could have easily bought a few more years of dominance if they had a good presence in India! There is a SUPER MONSTROUS FAN FOLLOWING HERE! If they take our market seriously people WILL BUY THEIR PRODUCTS!
    Also about iTunes. I think everybody outside th US knows what a big joke iTunes is! The Indian music and movie is way larger than Hollywood! If they have reasonable prices for music and movies iTunes can be a major hit here! For movies Apple can conceive ties with moserbaer (India), which sell latest movies on DVDs for not over $4!!! For original music there is much prospect for Both American and Indian music that can be sold on iTunes! Apple can make hefty profits here! The market is virtually BLANK! So what’s the deal with them?

  • llb443

    India has never been an important market for Apple. During the early ’90s when I was fresh in the advertising business, Macs ruled the Creative & Studio Departments of advertising agencies. Even then, the onus of marketing and servicing Macs was on the local re-seller. There wasn’t much of a concerted effort from Apple. Later, PC’s became pretty much the norm for graphics, Office Suites and everything else. Today, it’s common to find seasoned Art Directors being comfortable only on a Windows PC. Yes, there are Macs in Studios and Art Departments but it’s more an exception than the norm – chief culprit being the high price of the Mac.

    Then came the iPod which introduced Apple and it’s ecosystem to a whole new generation. And with much friendlier pricing, Macbook’s have an appeal to a potentially large audience. Apple re-sellers have mushroomed in major cities. So in terms of a product portfolio, at the high end they have iMacs, Macbook Pros and iPhone. At the popular pricing level, they have a few iPods and the Macbook. Add to it, a fantastic OS in Snow Leopard and accessories like Magic Mouse, the Apple portfolio is extremely appealing. And there is a retail network of sorts in place. Yet we all know that Apple is virtually a non-player in India – be it in mobile phones, desktops or laptops. The reason is not hard to seek: Apple is simply not interested in India.

    It’s a litany of woes for the Apple fan in India:

    – iPhone: a right royal pricing mess. It was DOA as far as India was concerned with that kind of pricing

    – no signs of iPhone 3Gs: this despite the promise made by Phil Schiller in Jan ‘09 that the iPhone 3Gs will be launched in Aug 09 here. The Apple re-sellers haven’t a clue and they keep giving fresh dates of launch every time you ask them.

    – no music on the iTunes India store: it’s moronic, to say the least, that in one of the world’s most music-rich countries, iTunes doesn’t offer music

    – every major Apple product released in the US doesn’t find it’s way here: the Magic Mouse being a case in point. It is still available on a ‘pre-order basis’ at the re-sellers.

    – Apple India’s Customer Support sucks

    Apple may not have huge market share or value ambitions from the Desktop/laptop market in India. They will never be able to compete with local manufacturers, assemblers on price. Plus, category dynamics are so stacked up against Apple. A market ruled by Microsoft, ubiquity of pirated software, ignorance of what Apple’s integrated approach really is, apathy towards Apple – there are enough reasons for Apple’s poor chances of success in India.

    With iPhone, I think they have a chance of generating huge volumes and value in India, if – and it’s a big if – Apple chooses to do so. India is far ahead of the US in many ways when it comes to the telecom market – we are a lot more demanding from our handset and service provider -the dynamics of the category are different here. Despite iPhone’s flaws – perceived or otherwise, I feel it was the best bet Apple had to broad-base their appeal. One of the big reasons for it’s success in the West – the App Store would have been a great advantage here. Even abroad, that advantage can dwindle any time. If Apple has 100,000 apps today, it’s a matter of time before the Android, Blackberry and Ovi stores populate their stores with large numbers. The fortress Apple built around the iPhone is not impregnable.

    Taking a cue from Apple’s App Store all the big boys have launched India-specific app stores. Nokia, Aircel (Pocketapps), Airtel (App Central), Blackerry – they all have their app stores. It’s a matter of time before India/city-specific apps come into the picture, with an ability to pay through local currency… maybe even through iTunes-like accounts. When that happens, any potential advantage the iPhone had would disappear.

    With a mobile population of 500mn and counting, India is a mouth watering prospect for telecom marketers. And the potential of VAS and ARPU is yet to be realized fully. But the bigger opportunity lies elsewhere. It is well documented that the classic pyramidal structure of Indian consumer markets will change to accommodate the bulging middle class (the Aspirers) in the near future.

    The estimated size of the Aspirer’s market is 124mn households. Agreed, not all of them may be potential customers for the iPhone. But with the right kind of pricing, a chunk of the Aspirers could be. This group, while being price sensitive is characterized by seeing premium experiences at popular prices. For them, the likeliest port of call when it comes to smartphones is unlikely to be an iPhone, given the marketing (or the lack of it) here in India.

    It is unlikely that Apple isn’t aware of the attraction of India, as a market. But they deliberately seem to be ignoring it. If and when they plan to make a fist of it here (with the iPhone perhaps, given the mobile population here), it may be too late. The competition seems to ha

  • PoohBearPenguin

    I recorded a little video on my Samsung Galaxy S Android phone from the normal camera/camcorder app. When I sent it to myself via email it saved as a 3gp. It would play on Windows Media Player, but anything else just read it as an audio file. I tried renaming it to an MP3, and MP4, and an AIF, but Movie Maker and VideoPad still could only read the audio track.

    I also have an audio recording I took using the Voice Recorder app on my Droid. When I emailed that to myself it saved as a .AMR and could be played in Windows Media Player but couldn’t be recognized by the movie creator programs. I tried renaming it to an MP3 and a .WAV, but it still could only be recognized in Windows Media Player.

    Is there a readable way to send these files to myself? Or to have them read on my Vista? Movie Maker says I don’t have the needed Codecs, but I had already downloaded every Codec and patch for Vista that I could find so that it would read MP4s.

  • Brody S

    says the file cannot be played and the player might not support the codec that was used to compress the file. i tried to play it on windows media player and vlc. The file plays on my phone fine but won’t play on my comp. and for some reason i cannot even email it to myself from my phone. i keep getting blank emails. this is an extremely important recording and i really need to be able to play it on my comp and send it through email. i’d really appreciate any help. ty in advance.

  • supernerd567

    I was curious to know if it’s possible to load an HTC HD7 with the Android OS? I know it’s possible for the iPhone so has anyone done it for the Window Phone? Sucks that their is no Flash Player so does anyone know of a 3rd party app on the market place that can substitute for this (tried to search but the market place search function pretty much sucks).

    If the phone”can” support Android. Is their also a way to partition it to have Windows also? Tutorials websites, and advice would be greatly appreciated. :)

  • RuMKilleR

    I’m currently deployed and my most common means of talking to my wife and family back home, 90% of the time, is through an app called text+call! I’ve been using this app on my HTC EVO 4G SPRINT ANDROID! Well the other day, the usb port had its last day and no longer charges! My question is can I buy another smart phone and just transfer the sd card for my pictures and music and just download the app again? Does the new smart phone have to be Sprint for the sd card to work? My friends suggest an IPOD TOUCH which can be bought on camp but I hate that I have to use ITUNES for music! I prefer free mp3 apps or transfering from windows media player! The more detailed answer, the better, and greatly, greatly appreciated!

  • David

    i want an app that i can stare at and trip out by controling it with my finger, like the spawn app for iphone. or any music visualizer apps that will have crazy lights thats colorful and moving to the beat of my music. im not looking for any strobe lights that just flash repeatedly with solid colors. something like how windows media player on a comp has cool visualizers that go along with the beat. same with itunes visualizer. please help!

  • Pacman

    I am considering a Windows 7 Phone for my next phone purchase, but I’m not sure about the software. It looks fine, but looks can be deceiving. As of now, I really just like the minimal interface it has; seems elegant. I’m also tired of the problems I have with Android such as glitches and force close and such. And I think iOS has just become old news, boredom.

    I would like someone that actually owns a Windows 7 Phone to answer. With one of the questions, I think you would have to have one in order to answer.

    1.) Does Windows Phone have problems, such as glitches or unresponsiveness (which would ultimately result in force close) often?
    2.) Android and iOS have the same basic layout, Windows is different, would you say it is easier to surf through or harder once you got the hang of it?
    3.) I read an Engadget article, and it said that it had a “Siri-esque,” service called Microsoft Tellme, or something like that. How is that service? Does it do all Siri does? Never mind whether it does it better or worse.
    4.) How is the music player on Windows phone, any notable features?
    5.) If I were to get a Windows 7(.5) phone now, would I have to buy a new phone in order to get Windows 8, or would it give it to me like iOS does?
    6.) Any notable problems the OS has that I should know about?
    7.) On my current phone, I had a problem about text messages. When I wanted the phone to save them for a specific thread, it would make texting using the same thread really slow, up to a few minutes to send a text after I pressed the send button. I made the sacrifice and moved the save limit for a thread from 1000 down to 100. Will Windows phone do the same thing?
    8.) Could you check the Windows app store/marketplace (don’t know what it is called), for a few of my essential apps I have on my iPod and Android. I’ll still have it, but wonder if these apps are on Windows as well. This question is caused by the fact that Windows, allegedly, has to pay people to make apps for their OS.
    — WolframAlpha —- Pandora —- Wikipedia/Articles (or some variation of either) —- CNN —- Youtube —- Soundhound — IMDB —-
    9.) Could you list any alternative web browsers they have in the Windows app store? I heard the default is really bad.
    Oh, and would you happen to know if I can mount a Windows phone to Ubuntu software? I have both OS’s, but use Ubuntu the most, need to know if I can use it for my Windows Phone too.

  • homerliveshere

    CES 2009 brought us a new player in the smartphone upper-echelon. Let’s drill down and see how the Palm Pre compares with the iPhone and Android’s G1.

    1. Multitouch touchscreen/gesture control: All three are capacitive, only the Pre and iPhone have multitouch. The Pre’s glowy little “gesture area” has dropped the touchable real estate all the way down tto the bottom of the phone, which is great for being able to navigate with one hand and not interfere with the screen at all. The wavey dock you bring up from the bottom looks awesome, but can you use it out of the box without a second thought or page through the manual? That’s my question. Advantage: iPhone/Pre tossup.

    2. Multitasking: One of the beefiest of our beefs with the iPhone SDK is its insistence on Apps running one at a time. The G1’s notifications drawer was definitely a step in the right direction, but the Pre’s interface is the first smartphone OS that was built with multitasking as a core design element. Resembling the Xbox’s old Blades, or a less-jarring OS X Expose even, the Pre’s “Cards” interface always places you in the context of every app running for fast switching, and notifications from other apps don’t pull you away completely from the task at hand. Multitasking is hugely important on a phone, and it’s a good sign that Palm recognizes. Advantage: Pre

    3. Hardware: Adrian says:

    While the hardware is definitely high quality, I’m not entirely blown away by the design. It looks really nice, and original, but it’s a little too cutesy in shape and kind of reminds me of an oversized pebble. A slightly larger screen could have definitely been put to good use, and I really don’t like the black space on the sides of the screen.

    A phone with a built-in QWERTY still hasn’t touched the iPhone in terms of sleekness and pure sex. And it might still be a while. Advantage: iPhone

    4. Development platform: The Pre’s “Web OS” sure sounds nice—all developers need to know is JavaScript, HTML and CSS? Sounds good in theory, but building a mobile app will never be as easy as cranking out a new theme for your Tumblr. Palm’s stressing ease of development, though, so it will be interesting to see how it stacks up against Apple’s solid, familiar-to-devs OS X-based SDK and Android’s fully open source approach. Advantage: Pre? If it’s straight-up JavaScript, that’s a lot of programmers ready to go. Note: we had iPhone here before, but we’ve switched with a qualification. Developer community still goes to iPhone for volume.

    5. Web Integration: The Pre subtly integrates the internet into the phone at every opportunity, and it’s awesome. Contacts get pulled in from Facebook, Gmail, IM and and scanned for dupes; the messaging app shows your last several emails, IMs and SMS with that contact in a single window. Really, really smart stuff. Advantage: Pre

    6. App Store/developer community: A smartphone is only as good as the software it runs. On the Pre, Palm is still keeping application delivery details like pricing behind the curtain, but they did say the app delivery will be entirely handled by the phone (without a desktop app), which is a shame. They’re saying that they’re not going to duplicate Apple’s Hobbesian app approval black box mistake, which Android has also hasn’t fallen for, but there will be an approval process based on “security and stability.” But as we know with Android, a dev community needs enough devices in the hands of consumers to reach critical mass, which the Pre will have to match. Advantage: iPhone, even with the black box, but Android and Pre’s more open stances are reassuring.

    7. Wireless charger: We’ve seen wireless charger tech for years at CES, but it’s taken this long for a major consumer gadget to come bundled with its own wireless charger in the box. Whoops, it’s not in the box, sold separately for unknown $$. But still: Bravo. Advantage: Pre

    8. The Network: Dan Hesse, Sprint’s CEO, gave our coast-to-coast 3G test a shout out in his press conference. Of course he did: Sprint won (in download speeds). Sprint was the only major carrier without a powerful, hype-catching smartphone choice, and now they have one. The Pre is a data-centric phone with a network we’ve proven to be strong in a large swatch of the country—that’s a good combo. But would you switch to Sprint for the Pre? Ugh. Advantage: Not cut and dry for everyone, but we stand by our numbers: Sprint is the best 3G network in our tests.

    9. Physical keyboard: It’s preference, but one held by a large swathe of the gadget buying public: physical QWERTY keypads are still the mainstream input of choice. Touch is getting better all the time, but a lot of people still want physical keyboards. But better yet is the ability to choose; unfortunately, the Pre doesn’t have a soft onscreen keyboard, and its slide-out is the same meh QWERTY from the Treo Pro. Advantage: It’s preference, but on me, the iPhone’s soft keyboard can’t be beat.

    10. Camera: The P
    re has an LED Flash for its 3MP camera, something both the iPhone and G1 lack. Flash cellphone photos are ugly, but for a lot of people, they’re good enough. So credit for throwing it in. Advantage: Pre

    11. Battery: Apple’s still an outlier with their non-removable battery; like the G1’s, the Pre’s comes out for a spare swap too. We’ve heard Apple’s reasons for this a million times, we know the drill, but removable batteries will never stop being handy. Advantage: Pre

    12. Copy & Paste: Yep, Pre’s got it. iPhone still doesn’t. Advantage: Pre/G1

    13. Browser: All three use a browser based on WebKit, which has become the standard for the mobile web. We couldn’t put it through our Mobile Browser Battlemodo ringer obviously, but what we saw looked great, and it’s the only other mobile browser besides the iPhone that supports multitouch zooming. Advantage: iPhone/Pre

    So there you have it. We’re excited. Are you?

    ( http://i.gizmodo.com/5126870/in-a-nutshell-palm-pre-vs-iphone-vs-g1 )
    More info on the Pre

    ( http://now.sprint.com/pre/?id9=SEM_Google_C_Sprint_Pre )

    ( http://www.palm.com/us/products/phones/pre/index.html )
    ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo3SZ_20kZI )

  • happyha31

    India has never been an important market for Apple. During the early ’90s when I was fresh in the advertising business, Macs ruled the Creative & Studio Departments of advertising agencies. Even then, the onus of marketing and servicing Macs was on the local re-seller. There wasn’t much of a concerted effort from Apple. Later, PC’s became pretty much the norm for graphics, Office Suites and everything else. Today, it’s common to find seasoned Art Directors being comfortable only on a Windows PC. Yes, there are Macs in Studios and Art Departments but it’s more an exception than the norm – chief culprit being the high price of the Mac.

    Then came the iPod which introduced Apple and it’s ecosystem to a whole new generation. And with much friendlier pricing, Macbook’s have an appeal to a potentially large audience. Apple re-sellers have mushroomed in major cities. So in terms of a product portfolio, at the high end they have iMacs, Macbook Pros and iPhone. At the popular pricing level, they have a few iPods and the Macbook. Add to it, a fantastic OS in Snow Leopard and accessories like Magic Mouse, the Apple portfolio is extremely appealing. And there is a retail network of sorts in place. Yet we all know that Apple is virtually a non-player in India – be it in mobile phones, desktops or laptops. The reason is not hard to seek: Apple is simply not interested in India.

    It’s a litany of woes for the Apple fan in India:

    – iPhone: a right royal pricing mess. It was DOA as far as India was concerned with that kind of pricing

    – no signs of iPhone 3Gs: this despite the promise made by Phil Schiller in Jan ‘09 that the iPhone 3Gs will be launched in Aug 09 here. The Apple re-sellers haven’t a clue and they keep giving fresh dates of launch every time you ask them.

    – no music on the iTunes India store: it’s moronic, to say the least, that in one of the world’s most music-rich countries, iTunes doesn’t offer music

    – every major Apple product released in the US doesn’t find it’s way here: the Magic Mouse being a case in point. It is still available on a ‘pre-order basis’ at the re-sellers.

    – Apple India’s Customer Support sucks

    Apple may not have huge market share or value ambitions from the Desktop/laptop market in India. They will never be able to compete with local manufacturers, assemblers on price. Plus, category dynamics are so stacked up against Apple. A market ruled by Microsoft, ubiquity of pirated software, ignorance of what Apple’s integrated approach really is, apathy towards Apple – there are enough reasons for Apple’s poor chances of success in India.

    With iPhone, I think they have a chance of generating huge volumes and value in India, if – and it’s a big if – Apple chooses to do so. India is far ahead of the US in many ways when it comes to the telecom market – we are a lot more demanding from our handset and service provider -the dynamics of the category are different here. Despite iPhone’s flaws – perceived or otherwise, I feel it was the best bet Apple had to broad-base their appeal. One of the big reasons for it’s success in the West – the App Store would have been a great advantage here. Even abroad, that advantage can dwindle any time. If Apple has 100,000 apps today, it’s a matter of time before the Android, Blackberry and Ovi stores populate their stores with large numbers. The fortress Apple built around the iPhone is not impregnable.

    Taking a cue from Apple’s App Store all the big boys have launched India-specific app stores. Nokia, Aircel (Pocketapps), Airtel (App Central), Blackerry – they all have their app stores. It’s a matter of time before India/city-specific apps come into the picture, with an ability to pay through local currency… maybe even through iTunes-like accounts. When that happens, any potential advantage the iPhone had would disappear.

    With a mobile population of 500mn and counting, India is a mouth watering prospect for telecom marketers. And the potential of VAS and ARPU is yet to be realized fully. But the bigger opportunity lies elsewhere. It is well documented that the classic pyramidal structure of Indian consumer markets will change to accommodate the bulging middle class (the Aspirers) in the near future.

    The estimated size of the Aspirer’s market is 124mn households. Agreed, not all of them may be potential customers for the iPhone. But with the right kind of pricing, a chunk of the Aspirers could be. This group, while being price sensitive is characterized by seeing premium experiences at popular prices. For them, the likeliest port of call when it comes to smartphones is unlikely to be an iPhone, given the marketing (or the lack of it) here in India.

  • veemodz

    I want to know what the best phone for under 200 pound is, It has to have 6 Mega pixel Camera or more with Flash, MP3 Player, Bluetooth, All the usuall awesome stuff, (IT MUST HAVE WI-FI) I don’t really want it on a contract I would prefer sim free… ( IT HAS TO HAVE A SCREEN BIGGER THAN 3.6 inch) I want to have access to an app market so probably Android or Windows 7 operating systems, (VIDEO RECORDER) Hd if possible, ((((( Has to be modern ))))) And also what is the latest android called???? ( Please send links to websites and phone names, cheapest place to get them. Thanks

  • altair

    Hi…I’m fairly computer savvy…I would place myself at the ability of being well above the gen public and being able to sort out gliches and problems myself but obviously definately below a proper tech. But I’m absolutely new to smartphones. I just got myself a new Motorola Defy….purely because I’ve got two kids who love grabbing my phone when I’m not looking and it advertises itself as a ‘lifeproof phone’. Anyway I just want to ask a few questions.

    1) When you download apps (esp free apps) do you often get other stuff you may not want with it….like when you download programs on your computer they often sneakily download their sponsors stuff like a google toolbar or something if you don’t pay attention and unclick the box. Because I’m seeing a few things in the apps list in the ‘manage apps’ option that are looking odd…but I didnt want to start uninstalling stuff willy-nilly.
    2) When you download a new app and it asks your permission to have full access to the internet and all your personal info and access to your SD card etc.. Is that wise? Again I only ever download free apps because I can’t afford to buy any. And I only download apps that have votes in the thousands and are usually on the popular lists and seem to be from trusted sources. I don’t care if I get advertising….I just don’t want any apps to compromise my phone….or to eat up my data uneccessarily.
    3) Do all the apps that ask to have access to the internet…are they using the internet when you use them? Like obviously they are if you are on Facebook or Youtube or Google maps….but if you are just playing a game that isn’t for 2 players…. like tetris or something…..is it eating your data??

    Any other tips or tricks or good to know things….please let me know!! I am willing to learn! :) And as previously stated….I am fairly tech savvy anyway….so its not like you are talking to your parents or anything lol (mine are hopeless! My Dad takes the laptop to the window when it gets too hot! hahaha)

  • Mr SoLo DoLo

    I have an older Android phone that is not hooked up to a service. I want to use it just as a music player.

    The touch screen is broken but it has a track pad that allows me to open apps, access settings, etc. but it cannot control the keyboard. Therefore I cannot type anything or get into the market.

    I want to root the phone so I can take off all the pre-installed, junk apps that came with it. I’ve downloaded z4root.apk. I was able to transfer it to (what I think is the root directory) the phone but have no way to get a file manager app onto it.

    I downloaded the SDK files. I’ve read instructions that say to run “sdkmanager”. I couldn’t find it in the downloaded files so I searched and found sdkmanager.jar. When I try to run it I get an error message, “The Java JAR file “sdkmanager.jar” could not be launched. Check the console for possible error messages”.

    I keep searching for help but I’m so confused. Is there some free, easy way of controlling my phone or installing apps onto my phone from my mac?

    Is the SDK stuff fairly easy and I’m just missing something? I will use Windows if I ABSOLUTELY have to but I’d much rather do this on a Mac.
    I’m using a Motorola Cliq XT, OS version 1.3, “install from unknown sources” is enabled in settings, hooked up to Mac 10.6.8.

  • Matthew David

    So I recently bought an android smart phones and its a total piece of junk, ive never had something this trash in my hole life. First of all I can only download 2 apps before I run out of memory wth? How do you move the apps to the sd card? I have some program app2sd but the apps still take up space on interal memory..

  • henryshensbcglobalnet

    I am going to college very soon to learn web design but aside I want to teach my self to build Android apps. I read that they use JavaScript to build those apps. My question is: Is JavaScript the most used language to build Android apps? What are other commonly used languages to build Android apps? Thanks

  • Balla

    I am having a broadband net connection on my pc. But I am unable to download those apps directly to my mobile. The android site shows “installed”, but its nowhere installed in my mobile.
    So how to do it? I am not having any net connection on my mobile, nor I am having wifi connection here.
    Please give detailed info about it.

  • Marlon P

    I have a few android apps I downloaded on utorrent on my laptop but I do not know how to put them into my android and get them to work. Any help would be great.

  • evangldbrg

    My android phone doesn’t have service but was wondering if i can download apps on it through WiFi.

  • Joe T

    I am an iPhone user but looking into Android for the first time. Of course when you look at iPhone/iPad apps in the App store you can look at the reviews and many times an app that has a lot of potential is full bugs, or just not ready for the market, or is just a waste of time and money.
    I dont see any reviews, so how do know what to buy and what to avoid?

  • Krazy Bob

    How do I adjust the apps in android like in the apple iphone? How do i get them to re-adjust automatically?

  • whites are not the only racists

    Ive got some great ideas for Apps, and am pretty good with computers/phones etc. what is the difference in designing android apps as oppose to iPhone apps?
    Cheers