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City of Heroes is No More
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City of Heroes is No More

by Jennifer KibbleSeptember 1, 2012

NCSoft has announced that they are shutting down Paragon Studios, which means the servers for the super hero MMO, City of Heroes will be shutting down roughly around November of this year. City of Heroes first started out back in 2004 and went free to play a few years ago. Those who wished to continue to pay and play would receive perks and players could always purchase  packs online.

Personally, I enjoyed City of Heroes up until it went free to play. Sadly, it was only a matter of time before another MMO would disappear.

Those who still play City of Heroes were greeted with an official statement from their website:

This morning we announced that Paragon Studios will be taking to the skies of City of Heroes for the last time.

In a realignment of company focus and publishing support, NCsoft has made the decision to close Paragon Studios. Effective immediately, all development on City of Heroes will cease and we will begin preparations to sunset the world’s first, and best, Super Hero MMORPG before the end of the year. As part of this, all recurring subscription billing and Paragon Market purchasing will be discontinued effective immediately. We will have more information regarding a detailed timeline for the cessation of services and what you can expect in game in the coming weeks.

The team here at Paragon deserves special praise for all that we have accomplished over the last 5+ years. These developers are some of the most creative and talented people in the gaming industry. By now, we’ve all been given this news internally, but to anyone who may be reading this message after the fact; know that your hard work and dedication has not gone unappreciated or unnoticed. To any potential studios looking to grow your team; hire these people. You won’t regret it.

To our Community,

Thank you. Thank you for your years of support. You’ve been with us every step of the way, sharing in our challenges, encouraging us to make City of Heroes better, more than everyone else thought it could be. We couldn’t have come this far without you. I implore you all, focus on the good things of CoH and Paragon Studios. Don’t dwell on the “how” or the “why”, but rather join us in celebrating the legacy of an amazing partnership between the players and the development team.

About The Author
Jennifer Kibble
  • PillowMan1234

    It’s TRUE, that, I’ve never MET him, – probably, never WILL, – but, it makes NO DIFFERENCE, to me! He is a former serviceman who was told he would never use his legs again! He has visited City’s Etihad Stadium as part of an epic 2,012 mile challenge.

    Phil Packer has taken on the mammoth walk in a bid to raise £15 million to help build a centre of inspiration for young people facing adversity.

    As part of his route, Phil walked four miles around City’s home ground, proving again and again that “Anything is possible,” in line with the motto of his charity – The British Inspiration Trust (BRIT).

    “I came to Manchester City today because young people aspire to be sports personalities; they look up to players, coaches and the management,” he said.

    The former British Officer suffered a severe spinal cord injury in Iraq in 2008 and for him, walking 8-10 miles is the equivalent of a marathon for a person without a spinal cord injury.

    Upon reaching the half-way mark, Phil will be launching an appeal to businesses to pledge either £10,000 for the capital build or £5,000 for specialist equipment, to make the BRIT Centre of Inspiration a reality.

    He aims to complete his challenge in London in mid-December.

    Message, – from ME, – TO Phil:- “GOD BLESS YOU, – SIR! YOU ARE A HERO, IN MORE WAYS, THAN ONE!!!”

  • Jeanelle the Retard

    I’m beta testing Champions online super hero MMO. (sort of like city of heroes if you ever played but more comic bookish.)

    I made a very nice looking female super hero, or at least I think so but i have NO idea what to name her.

    Here is a picture of her.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v324/xrawwrx/Random%20Shit/nameme.jpg

    at the moment she uses force type powers. I don’t know how to explain it. (its just a preset game power set thing.)

    I may change it when it get in and start playing but that’s what I chose for her for now.

    Also if you really want to be a doll you can throw in a couple bio ideas.
    I have a bio written out but i don’t really like how its coming along so i was hoping to get a few outside suggestions.

    Thanks!
    EDIT; Since that picture I have ADDED ARMOR PLATED PANTS INSTEAD OF THE SKIRT AND FISHNETS.

    the skirt and fishnets looked too “club going punk girl” and not enough “ass-kicking super hero”

    so yeah. I covered up her legs. lol.

  • D3ZZY

    I think i will start playing city of heroes. What cds do i need to buy?
    If i get the city of heroes/city of villains combined edition do i get the game plus all the expansions?? or do i need to buy something else?

  • joevsyou

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a

  • Rishabh Bajpai

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a

  • Dr Dorian

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a

  • Adam

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a

  • simply complicated

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a

  • x_blind_x_gamer_x

    i have a ncsoft account and a city of heroes account that has been inactive for more than 90 days. i want to know if someone can send me an reactivation code so that we both can get 15 days free.

  • Stevalicious

    JBL is an American audio electronics company currently owned by Harman International. It was founded in 1946 by James Bullough Lansing. Their primary products are loudspeakers and associated electronics. There are two independent divisions within the company — JBL Consumer and JBL Professional. The former produces audio equipment for the home market while the latter produces professional equipment for the studio, installed sound, tour sound, portable sound (production and DJ), and cinema markets.

    [edit] History
    James B. Lansing founded JBL the year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Incorporated, and dated from 1 October 1946 and then changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and D175 The high frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near copies of Altec Lansing products. First original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a 4-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

    The Marquardt Corporation gave the company early manufacturing space and a modest investment. William H. Thomas, the treasurer of Marquardt Corporation, represented Marquardt on Lansing’s Board of Directors. In 1948 Marquardt took over operation of the JBL. In 1949 Marquardt was purchased by General Tire Company. The new company was not interested in the loudspeaker business and severed ties with Mr. Lansing. The company was reincorporated as James B. Lansing, Incorporated, and moved to its first private location on 2439 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles.

    A key to JBL’s early development was Mr. Lansing’s close business relationship with its primary supplier of Alnico V magnetic material, Robert Arnold of Arnold Engineering. Arnold Engineering extended favorable terms and deep credit to Mr. Lansing. Robert Arnold saw JBL as an opportunity to sell Alnico V magnetic material into a new market.

    James Lansing was noted as an innovative engineer, but a poor businessman. For the next 3 years Mr. Lansing struggled to pay invoices and ship product. As a result of deteriorating business conditions and personal issues, he took his own life on September 4, 1949. The company then passed into the hands of Bill Thomas, JBL’s then vice-president. Mr. Lansing had taken out a $10,000 life insurance policy naming the company as the beneficiary. That allowed Mr. Thomas to continue the company after Mr. Lansing’s death. Soon after, Mr. Thomas purchased Mrs. Lansing’s one-third interest in the company and became the sole owner of the company. Mr. Thomas was responsible for revitalizing the company and spearheading a remarkable period of growth for the two decades following the founding of JBL[1].

    Early products included the model 375 high frequency driver and the 075 UHF (Ultra High Frequency) ring radiator driver. The ring radiator drivers are also known as “JBL bullets” because of their distinctive shape. The 375 was a re-invention of the Western Electric 594 driver but with a Alnico V magnet and a 4-inch voice coil. The 375 shared the same basic magnet structure as the D-130 woofer. JBL engineers Ed May and Bart Locanthi created these designs.[2]

    Two products from that era, the Hartsfield and the Paragon, continue to be highly desired on the collectors market.

    In 1955 the brand name JBL was introduced to resolve ongoing disputes with Altec Lansing Corporation. The company name “James B. Lansing Sound, Incorporated” was retained, but the logo name was changed to JBL with the distinctive exclamation point logo.[3]

    The JBL 4320 series studio monitor was introduced through Capitol Records in Hollywood and became the standard monitor worldwide for its parent company, EMI. JBL’s introduction to rock and roll music came via the adoption of the D130 loudspeaker by Leo Fender’s Fender Guitar company as the ideal driver for electric guitars.

    In 1969, Bill Thomas sold JBL to the Jervis Corporation (later renamed Harman International) headed by Dr. Sidney Harman. The 1970s saw JBL become a household brand, starting with the famous L-100, which was the best-selling loudspeaker model of any company to that date. The 1970s also saw a major JBL expansion in the professional audio field from their studio monitors. By the end of the decade recording studios in the United States used more JBL monitors than all other brands combined. The JBL L-100 and 4310 control monitors were noteworthy, popular home speakers. In the 1980’s the L-100, 4312 and others were updated with aquaplas-laminated midrange and woofer drivers, and a titanium-deposited tweeter diaphragm, the new designations being the L-80T, L-100T, L-120T and the flagship L-250ti. To test speaker drivers, JBL in Northridge used the roof as a